Monday, December 3, 2012

Edgeless Reversible Cables

Ah, at last I can share my Reversible Cables Scarf, now that the 2013 Interweave Crochet Winter issue has been revealed. If you have seen my Reversible Rowan Tree Vest, you may recognize the cable treatment I used for the edging on the Vest in the "Pinebark Scarf". This is another uncommon technique I have been experimenting with, making cables which not only stand alone rather than on a background of solid stitches, but are completely reversible, the same on both sides.

I suppose I was inspired by the Rapunzel Scarf on the cover of the 2011 Interweave Accessories issue, as I thought it was an actual cable when I first saw the photo. Although that design creates a very clever faux cable using braiding, I was rather disappointed that it was not actual cables and took it upon myself to work out how to create cables that would have a similar look but could be worked in rows.

Of course, as a scarf, I thought it should look the same on both sides. I did a little more experimenting with alternating front and back post stitches on the same row to make them reversible, and found a little trick for how to insert your hook so the cables go all the way to the edges rather than straight stitches on either side. 

I seem to have recently become focused on developing crocheted fabrics that are reversible, whether colorwork or cables. Perhaps because as a left-handed crocheter and designer, I find it easier to have no right or wrong side to the work.

Yarn Tip: Although the sheen gives a great effect, the Berroco Captiva yarn I used was a little bit difficult to work with. However, I discovered that once I got the forever tangling yarn into a center-pull ball, slipping it into a small drawstring bag avoided further tangles by holding the shape of the ball as it gets smaller. This works with any slicker yarn which does not want to stay in a ball.

7 comments:

  1. Your scarf is looking wonderful Laurinda! I´m thinking to make one for my sister and give it to her at Christmas. I´m sure she will love it!
    Have a great day!

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  2. I am reading the Interweave pattern and looking at the diagram and running into a problem. Pattern says "2 dc, 8 crossed cables, 2 dc," and diagram shows that. However, the instruction for Row 2 also says "Chain 3 (counts as dc), dc-lb", {there's 2 of the dc}, then goes on to the pattern stitches, and finally says "dc-lb in top of beg ch-4" {only one more dc}. Where does the fourth dc come in? The diagram shows the dc-lb in the top of the first actual treble from row 1 and a standard dc in the turning chain.

    Hope you can clarify!

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    1. Yes! It should read "dc-lb in next tr, dc in top of beg ch-4".

      Sorry for the confusion. We went through a couple variations on what to call the "dc-lb", and I think the first dc got accidentally edited out when they changed the terminology. Thanks for checking! Would love to see how it turns out!

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  3. thanks for the speedy response! Will let you know how it goes!

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  4. Is there any chance you would provide the left-handed instructions for this scarf for your lefty fans? I'd love to try it out... ( couldn't figure out the Name /URL for commenting, so had to do it as Anonymous)

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    1. I always try to avoid directional terms in my patterns, so they should be easily done left or right handed. Only the stitch diagram is right-handed on this pattern, but those are easy to reverse yourself. Check out my recent article from Crochet Today magazine for how to read stitch diagrams as a lefty: http://www.crochettoday.com/how-to/simple-guide-left-handed-crocheters.

      I hope that helps. But will be glad to answer any specific questions if you have them!

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  5. Laurinda, I can't find this pattern and it is a perfect match for a hat I have already made (except the hat isn't reversible); could you point me to a copy, please?

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